In a recent interview with The Telegraph, the head of the OCR exam board Mark Dawe has argued that students should be able to use Google when sitting GCSE and A-level exams.

Mr Dawe argued that introducing Google to exams will allow examiners to assess how students draw on and interpret information. Similar to allowing calculators in a Mathematics exam, this would mean that each student had access to the same computational ability, but their skill at utilising that would be the measure of their ability.

He further argued for using Google in exams because that is how people access information in day-to-day life, rather than memorising all of the information, stating “that’s not how the modern world works”. Mr Dawe has been criticised by Chris McGovern, chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, who argues that with allowing access to the internet will lower the standards of examinations further, and will not test a pupil’s knowledge and understanding.

Applicants for vocational courses such as Law and Medicine should consider how useful examinations with access to the internet will be in testing career rigour, when those careers require vast, immediate knowledge.

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