The house where F Scott Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby has gone on sale.

The seven-bedroom house in Long Island is the setting for much of the novel where he and his wife lived for two years in the 1920s. The focus of the novel is Jay Gatsby, owner of a lavish Long Island home in the 1920s Jazz Age based upon Fitzgerald’s own home and facets of his personality. Historians and Architecture applicants should investigate the cultural legacy surrounding famous buildings, particularly Hotel Chelsea which has a similarly lavish and literary history.

The Great Gatsby’s title was something which Fitzgerald himself was unsure of, up until its publication. The title that was last documented by Fitzgerald was Under the Red, White, and Blue, and English applicants should investigate how Americana and modernism tie together in literature and art, particular during the Jazz Age when counterculture rebellion became mainstream.

Fine Art and History of Art applicants should particularly take note of how The Great Gatsby’s Jazz Age setting was influenced by Art Deco culture. Students applying for these subjects should think about how Art Deco was a label retroactively applied to this period in the 1920s and 1930s, and question how art historians quantify periods and transitions in art.

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