With the recent release of the sequel to Blade Runner, starring Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling, the debate around the relationship between computers and humans has become a centre point of the later stages of the technological revolution.

Scientists and non-scientists alike for a long time focused on computers useful ability to shift through large amounts of data in a short time.

However, recent research fields have not only reached that wall, but have moved past it – prompting questions about artificial intelligence’s capacity to learn more ‘human tasks.’

An article on the BBC News website, by a professor at Dundee University poses: ‘But what if AI were able to handle the most human of tasks – navigating the minefield of subtle nuance, rhetoric and even emotions to take us on in an argument?

In particular the article focuses on how robots could form an argument. This is a field known as argument technology.

Students looking to read computer science may want to look more closely at how the development of robots has passed through each step of development, and reached this point.

The most recent advances have been based within the increase of the amount of data available to train computers in the art of debate. This means in the future, we may be able to train A.I. to give persuasive arguments, and the a new generation of lawyers!

Students hoping to study linguistics, philosophy or computer science may similarly look into how the human form of argument is relatable to the human invention of computers.

Students who are looking to study the field of law may want to look into how the law will react to regulate this kind of sociological and technological revolution, if it is able to actualise.

More Resources